Taye Diggs' TikTok is chaotic comedy gold, just ask the internet – Upworthy

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Taye Diggs.
Some people were just born to entertain. Taye Diggs is one of those people.
Diggs has graced Broadway stages, the silver screen and our television sets. Now he’s found a new platform: TikTok. And let me tell you, this man has got it, whatever “it” is.
You want pure comedy? He delivers. You want weird? He’s got that too. Diggs is already serving up plenty of entertaining content, ranging from driving selfies to dance clips to songs about putting fish in the microwave. Yup, it’s a one-stop TikTok shop.
Having only joined the app this week, Diggs hasn’t quite figured everything out, like how to use TikTok sound effects. But who needs it when you can just make your own? You could say the actor is going for a no-frills approach—his videos are without transitions, effects, filters … or planning, apparently.
As one person wrote on Twitter, the entire account is “pure chaos and comedy.”

Diggs is most famous for playing calm, cool, collected (and utterly smooth) roles like Benny in “Rent” and Harper in “The Best Man.” Which is in part why fans are eating up his goofy schtick and silly TikTok antics.

Case in point: his “ICON trying….” video where he attempts—and fails—to recreate some of those influencer-worthy flashy transitions. What we get instead is a roller-coaster ride of clumsy shots (at one point he’s upside down and putting on a hat?), some gibberish lyrics, and all the while Diggs sporting a highly appropriate “DAD” sweatshirt. It’s nothing short of hilarious.

Nothing says “cool” quite like stomping on your phone, am I right?

I mean, just take a look at some of his greatest hits…

Like when he was on set for “All American” and tried to get Kareem Grimes to dance with him. 

@tiktoktaye

♬ original sound – Taye Diggs

Grimes would not budge. Well, at least until the very end.

Or laughing at himself in the car. Literally. 

@tiktoktaye

♬ original sound – Taye Diggs

Totally fine if you’re not entertained. Taye Diggs is happy just making himself laugh.

Or his “jerk, jerk jerk” dance. 

@tiktoktaye

JERK?

♬ original sound – Taye Diggs

Reminding us all the “everybody’s a jerk, jerk, jerk.”

Now that Diggs has has begun cross-posting some of the gold onto Twitter, the reactions are growing tenfold.

Some are calling for a “Taye Diggs TikTok timeout.”

This poor person was brought to tears.

Though most just wanted to praise him and get a taste of that secret sauce.

He might have even converted a few former non-Tokkers.

Another poor soul overcome with emotion at Diggs’ shenanigans.

Some were feeling a certain … comradery … with Mr. Diggs. 

The general consensus? Taye Diggs + TikTok = the best kind of chaos.

Now that you’ve made it this far down the Taye-Diggs-TikTok-rabbit hole, you might be feeling like you just can’t get enough of the online discord. Don’t fret, you’re in luck!

Diggs will be hosting the 27th Annual Critic’s Choice Awards on Jan 9, 2022 alongside the equally hilarious Nicole Byer. It’s sure to be a riot.

And then of course, you can always follow @theofficialtayediggs on TikTok. If you’re brave enough.

Diggs is most famous for playing calm, cool, collected (and utterly smooth) roles like Benny in “Rent” and Harper in “The Best Man.” Which is in part why fans are eating up his goofy schtick and silly TikTok antics.
Case in point: his “ICON trying….” video where he attempts—and fails—to recreate some of those influencer-worthy flashy transitions. What we get instead is a roller-coaster ride of clumsy shots (at one point he’s upside down and putting on a hat?), some gibberish lyrics, and all the while Diggs sporting a highly appropriate “DAD” sweatshirt. It’s nothing short of hilarious.
ICON trying…. pic.twitter.com/eO74eOnxVq
Nothing says “cool” quite like stomping on your phone, am I right?
I mean, just take a look at some of his greatest hits…

Grimes would not budge. Well, at least until the very end.

Totally fine if you’re not entertained. Taye Diggs is happy just making himself laugh.
JERK?
Reminding us all the “everybody’s a jerk, jerk, jerk.”
Now that Diggs has has begun cross-posting some of the gold onto Twitter, the reactions are growing tenfold.
I really want somebody to take Taye Diggs’ phone away😭😭 pic.twitter.com/2faGJo2O3r
Who let taye diggs on tiktok I’m cryinggggg
This poor person was brought to tears.
they should’ve never given Taye Diggs a tiktok 😭 https://t.co/elCkjjUPc1
Taye Diggs hasn’t figured out how to add music to his TikTok’s yet, but I’ll take two of whatever he’s sipping 😭 Good morning #clique! ☀️ pic.twitter.com/GOiHpuvr8k
I wanna be taye diggs when I’m older
No one has enough Taye Diggs in their life, so you’re welcome. https://t.co/aup0pwB9zK
Feel like I would get along with Taye Diggs cuz he really don’t be giving a damn just expressing himself without a care in the world lol. Love it https://t.co/aubsq1I9P2
Me and the other 40 year olds on our way to join tiktok for more taye diggs pic.twitter.com/CeduuuuXWX
I only downloaded Tik Tok because of Taye Diggs that man have me crying
Another poor soul overcome with emotion at Diggs’ shenanigans.
Love it, @TayeDiggs you maybe the reason I get a #TikTok 😂
Taye diggs’ tiktok is literally what its like for me living alone😂😂
i’m laughing with Taye Diggs not at him cause he doing what i do when i’m alone😭😭
taye diggs’ tiktok is chaotic but in a good way lmfaoo
If you want fulfilment in life, then follow Taye Diggs on TikTok. He is truly unhinged
Taye Diggs is a different type of chaotic on TikTok 😭 that man is so nutty.
Nicole Byer and Taye Diggs to Host the 27th Critics Choice Awards https://t.co/Wk0D2YjiLM pic.twitter.com/gG0cUXmtsJ
Now that you’ve made it this far down the Taye-Diggs-TikTok-rabbit hole, you might be feeling like you just can’t get enough of the online discord. Don’t fret, you’re in luck!
Diggs will be hosting the 27th Annual Critic’s Choice Awards on Jan 9, 2022 alongside the equally hilarious Nicole Byer. It’s sure to be a riot.
And then of course, you can always follow @theofficialtayediggs on TikTok. If you’re brave enough.
Keanu Reeves “John Wick” red carpet, Fantastic Fest 2014 Austin, Texas
A recent NFT (non-fungible token) boom has a lot of people scratching their heads over why someone would pay over a million dollars for a digital art file that can be easily replicated by right-clicking “Save as.” But NFT enthusiasts are willing to pay ridiculous amounts for the artwork because they have a certificate of digital ownership that cannot be replicated.

Much like a piece of physical artwork such as painting, you can create a replica of an NFT but there are a limited number of originals. This has ushered in a new era where digital assets can now possess the type of scarcity usually attributed to physical objects.
This new form of manufactured scarcity seems to many as another way for powerful people to claim ownership over things that are shared by the general public.
“Sure, you can enjoy this drawing of an ape,” the NFT owner proudly states. “But I own the ape! It says so on the blockchain.”

In a recent interview with The Verge about how the digital world is slowly encroaching upon real life, “Matrix Resurrections” stars Keanu Reeves and Carrie-Anne Moss were asked by Alex Heath about the notion of digital scarcity. The question made Reeves lose composure and he let out a large cackle, exclaiming “They’re easily reproduced.”
Reeve’s outburst inspired Heath to push back, claiming “But it’s not the same.”
“The Matrix” star’s outburst was cathartic to many people who think that NFTs are nothing but an elitist scam. The clip quickly went viral on social media, earning a lot of hilarious and thoughtful responses.
This is how NFTs work pic.twitter.com/WWymNTsBj5
I own this ticket. Not the artist. There’s only 10 of them in existence. You can’t “right click-save” this physical ticket.

With NFTs, you don’t own ANYTHING but a picture. You can’t even make a physical copy without it infringing on the artist’s copyright.

What good is that? pic.twitter.com/1DBHO8einR
NFTs are proof that capitalists will try to restrict the supply of anything to try to make it profitable
Mah dude was like "but but here's why copy/paste or right-click/save-as is uh…wait a minute".
The guy gives these vibes pic.twitter.com/aHAMvWYZJL
"BuT iT's NoT tHe SaMe" It is, actually. When i right click and save an nft, I have experienced the nft in the same way that the "owner" has and i didn't pay a dime.
pic.twitter.com/siKETTpHv7
Why people trying so hard to make virtual worlds as greedy as the real world?
The purpose of art is to be experienced, not owned. A bunch of bros mistaking art for investment doesn't change that

Made by P&G Studios and Harder Than You Think, the team behind Netflix’s documentary Rising Phoenix.
Sophie Morgan
Over the past few years, there has been an incredible rise in global consciousness about social justice. But there’s been one exceptionally large group that’s been mostly absent from the conversation, people with disabilities.

The World Health Organization estimates there are 1.2 billion people with disabilities across the globe, which accounts for 15% of the total human population.
“To truly create an accessible and equitable world, a place where everyone feels safe and has the courage to be themselves, we have work to do,” Sophie Morgan, British Television Presenter, and disability advocate says on the first episode of the “Equal Too” podcast. “We have to change the law. Transform culture. Rebuild our cities. Increase visibility. And to do so we must empower everyone to be involved.”
As activists such as Morgan work to change public consciousness surrounding the issues facing 1.2 billion people with disabilities, they face a major question. What are the biggest challenges and what work is needed to drive equality?

To address these pressing concerns, Harder Than You Think, the team behind the Emmy-award winning Netflix documentary Rising Phoenix, and P&G Studios launched “Equal Too: Achieving Disability Equality” a 6-part podcast that aims to answer these pressing questions by talking to disability activists, athletes, politicians, and those working to make the world more accessible.
What’s unique about this podcast is that 61% of its team of producers, guests, and contributors identify as disabled.
The podcast recently wrapped up its sixth and final episode so now is a great time to binge-listen to this compelling podcast that attempts to create a cohesive agenda for people with disabilities in the wake of one of the most successful Paralympic Games to date.
The show is hosted by Morgan who sustained a T6 spinal cord injury in a traffic accident in 2003, resulting in paralysis from the chest down.
Morgan was a lead host for Channel 4’s Paralympics coverage.
Throughout the six episodes, Morgan took a look back at the history and the legacy of the Paralympic movement and the impact it’s had on host cities and beyond. She also spoke with actress Jameela Jamil (“The Good Place”) who has Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, a group of disorders that affect connective tissue, about ableism in Hollywood.
“For someone who maybe has just found that they have a disability, that someone they love does, or they want to be an ally for people with disabilities, this is a perfect series for you,” Jamil says. “It’s full of very real conversations, but they’re incredibly entertaining, too.”

Morgan also had a conversation with Keely Cat Wells who runs a talent agency for disabled talent and Yoshihiko Kawauchi, an architect and wheelchair user who advised Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020 on venue construction.

After six episodes, the show’s co-producer, Sinead Burke, is proud that she and Morgan were able to achieve the show’s ultimate goal of inclusivity.

“I think it’s been so brilliant to have six different threads of conversations under the umbrella of disability,” she said on episode 6, “The Decade Ahead.” “When we began this podcast we had lots of conversations back and forth about who the audience was. Was it non-disabled people? Was it disabled people? Or was it allies? Was it athletes? One of the things we’ve been really considerate around is making sure that across these six episodes that we appeal to listen to amplify and bring questions to each of those audiences.”
Morgan boiled the far-reaching effort down to one big takeaway. People with disabilities need greater representation in the places where decisions are being made.
“I feel that the next part of this journey to take that giant leap forward, not slowly incremental changes, we need to see disabled people in decision-making roles,” she said in episode 6.
“We need to see disabled people across the board because then we don’t need to present our argument for why you need to be represented or why you should be in the room,” she added. “Somebody will get it already. The paradigm shift will happen organically.”
To be a part of the new push towards equality for the 15% of humanity living with a disability, listen to ‘Equal Too: Achieving Disability Equality’ now on iHeart Radio or wherever you get your podcasts.
A teen watches as an employer looks at her resume.
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a massive shake-up in the American labor market and for many, the change has been positive. Many Americans quit their job this year because they feel optimistic that after enduring some of the harshest working conditions during the pandemic, they can find better work that pays more elsewhere.

This sea change in the labor market comes on the heels of the nation’s collective dedication to the idea that people should be paid a living wage and it should be somewhere around $15 an hour.
The change in attitudes toward work has many younger people feeling empowered to ask for better compensation and treatment in their young careers. This was perfectly evidenced by a mother on Reddit who praised her 19-year-old daughter for refusing to accept $9 an hour.
In the post’s title, the mother wrote: “I’m really proud of my 19 year old daughter. She was offered $9/hr at a second interview today and declined telling them she couldn’t feed herself with that.”

“She told me she was polite about it, which she always is, but I was still a bit taken back initially that she would say this directly to the shop owner. It was somewhere she really wanted to work and has been going to since she was a kid,” the mom continued.
The employer admitted that they weren’t paying “a living wage” and apologized for not being able to offer more. The daughter also had some leverage because she was making $10.50 an hour at another job.
The 41-year-old mother was impressed because when she was in her teens, younger workers were forced to accept any deal they were offered and had little leverage or confidence to ask for anything more than substandard.
“I’m 41 and when I was her age I would’ve taken any s*** pay they offered me just for the experience and so I could work at my favorite shop. And I would’ve been grateful for the opportunity for them to take full advantage of me,” she explained. “I would’ve never had the confidence to stand up to an older adult in a position of power like that,” she added. “I told her I was so proud of her for knowing her worth and not accepting anything less.”

Reddit user jakeyeah111 had the best response to the post. “Yup. The amount of older people who are mad that the younger generation isn’t letting themselves get stepped all over anymore is… off-putting,” they wrote.
The mother’s post mirrors trends that people are seeing across income levels in America. The average reservation wage, or the minimum annual wage consumers said they needed before they would even consider accepting a job offer, has risen more than $14,000 over the past six years to $68,954.
On ZipRecruiter, the number of jobs offering $15 an hour has more than doubled over the past two years.
The changes in the labor market and public opinion are a wonderful development for the U.S. economy. Instead of cultivating a market where people are forced to accept less than they believe they’re worth, employers and employees are working to create mutually beneficial relationships that uplift everyone.

Actor Justin Baldoni exemplified patient parenting when his daughter had a meltdown at the store.
This article originally appeared on 06.23.17


Just ask any parent.
Grocery stores, malls, and restaurants (or any place with lots of people around) in particular seem to bring out the worst in our little ones, prompting explosive tantrums that can make even the most stoic parent turn red-faced with embarrassment.
But why be embarrassed? It’s just kids being kids, after all.
Baldoni, best known for his role on the show “Jane the Virgin,” shared a photo his wife, Emily, took while the family was shopping at the local Whole Foods.

In it, Baldoni, along with his father, stares down at his daughter, Maiya. She’s crying and/or wailing on the floor. Who knows about what. Her body is twisted into classic tantrum pose.
The two men look calm. Almost amused, but not in a mocking way.
They certainly are not embarrassed despite a horde of people around them in the store.
When Baldoni posted the photo to his Facebook, he recalled the way his father used to act during the actor’s own tantrums, and how it helped shape him into the man he is today.
The post continued:
The photo, which Baldoni calls one of his favorites ever, shows the advice in action.
But being the perfect parent doesn’t mean your kid never gets angry or frustrated or confused. As Baldoni writes, toddlers are really just beginning to learn and explore the world’s boundaries. There’s naturally going to be a lot of swirling emotions as they encounter things and situations they can’t understand.
What’s important is we don’t teach them to hide those feelings or push them down for fear of ridicule — that kind of emotion-management can come back to haunt us as adults. Working through our feelings, or just having a good cry right there in the middle of the grocery store, is an important skill to learn.
The emotional health of our children is certainly worth a few weird stares from people we’ll never seen again.

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